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CD Review: Take Me Where I Don't Know I Am by David Greenberger, Keith Spring, and Dinty Child with Keiichi Hashimoto

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David Greenberger, Keith Spring, and Dinty Child with Keiichi Hashimoto

Take Me Where I Don't Know I Am

(2016, PelPel Recordings)

Take Me Where I Don't Know I Am is based on conversations with residents of a nursing home in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. David Greenberger voices the words of these elderly souls over 19 diverse musical compositions aided by arranger, producer, and original NRBQ saxophonist Keith Spring, multi-instrumentalist Dinty Child (Session Americana, Chandler Travis), and Keiichi Hashimoto on trumpet and trombone. The musings of an eclectic cast of characters cut to the quick of life's dichotomies.

Random, fleeting, meaningful, absurd, and sublime, the music mirrors these moods with appropriate intimacy as early to mid-century soul, jazz, R&B, and Americana provide an ambient, melodic backdrop to the lucid nostalgia of our storytellers. Their experiences come alive amidst funky drums and guitars, piano, mandolin, and banjo. Melancholic accordion, horns, and organ provide further periodesque and film noiry accompaniment. Although some of the stories tug at the heart strings, most are witty, many are off-the-wall, and all surprise and interest. The Greenwich, New York-based Greenberger publishes The Duplex Planet series of zines and is a radio commentator for NPR. His passion for the people whose words he speaks is obvious, as is the care in which the music was produced and arranged to accompany the derth of topic. DuplexPlanet.com.

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